Moldova

2017

Cultural practices associated to the 1st of March

Bulgaria, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Republic of Moldova , Romania

Inscribed in 2017 (12.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Cultural Practices Associated to the 1st of March comprise traditions transmitted since ancient

Cultural practices associated to the 1st of March

© Tsvetelina Dimitrova, Pavel Hadzihev, Bulgarian National Television-Archive (Bulgaria); Opetcheska Tatarchevska/2014 (Macedonia); Ministry of Culture of Republic of Moldova; Consatntin Brăiloiu Institute of Ethnography and Folklore, Romanian Academy, 2016

times to celebrate the beginning of spring. The main practice consists of making, offering and wearing a red and white thread, which is then untied when the first blossom tree, swallow or stork is seen. A few other local practices also form part of a larger spring celebration, such as purification actions in Moldova. The artefact is considered to provide symbolic protection against perils such as capricious weather, with the practice ensuring a safe passage from winter to spring for individuals, groups and communities. All members of the communities concerned participate, irrespective of their age, and the practice contributes to social cohesion, intergenerational exchange and interaction with nature, fostering diversity and creativity. Informal education is the most frequent means of transmission: in rural areas, young girls are taught how to make the thread by older women, while in urban areas apprentices learn from teachers, craftspeople and through informal education. Another occasion for transmission is provided by Martenitsa/Martinka/Mărţişor workshops organized by ethnographic museums. The communities concerned are actively involved in efforts to inventory, research, document and promote the element, and numerous cultural projects geared at its safeguarding are underway.

Making-of-martisor-thread

© Constantin Brăiloiu Institute of Ethnography and Folklore, Romanian Academy, 2014



2016

Traditional wall-carpet craftsmanship in Romania and the Republic of Moldova

RomaniaRepublic of Moldova

Inscribed in 2016 (11.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

© Ministry Of Culture of Romania / Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Moldova : Studioul Video Art

© Ministry Of Culture of Romania / Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Moldova : Studioul Video Art

In the past, wall carpets produced by weavers in communities of Romania and the Republic of Moldova were used not only as decorative features and sources of insulation but also as part of a bride’s dowry. A variety of techniques were needed to produce the pieces with impressive motifs. Certain patterns also indicated where the weaver was from. The carpets had additional roles in community practices, such as at funerals where they symbolized a passage for the soul to the hereafter. They were also displayed at international exhibitions as markers of national identity. These days, wall carpets are mainly appreciated as works of art for public and private spaces and exhibited at city festivals and ceremonies. Techniques have changed from vertical or horizontal looms practised in some parts, to tight picking (thread by thread) and other forms with weavers now able to work from home. In villages, girls learn the art form from their mother or grandmother, while in cities craft centers, associations and colleges, as well as museums provide classes. Viewed as an expression of creativity and identity marker, wall carpet craftsmanship is also considered as a tool to unite groups in society of different ages and socioeconomic backgrounds.

© Ministry Of Culture of Romania, 2015

© Ministry Of Culture of Romania, 2015

2013

Men’s group Colindat, Christmas-time ritual

RomaniaRepublic of Moldova

Inscribed in 2013 (8.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

© 23.03.2012 by Institute of Ethnography and Folklore "Constantin Brailoiu"

© 23.03.2012 by Institute of Ethnography and Folklore “Constantin Brailoiu”

 

Each year before Christmas, groups of young men gather in villages throughout Romania and the Republic of Moldova to prepare for the ritual of Colindat. On Christmas Eve, they go from house to house performing festive songs. Afterwards, the hosts offer the singers ritual gifts and money. The songs have an epic content, which is adapted to each host’s individual circumstances. Ritual performers also sing special, auspicious songs for unmarried girls and dance with them – a practice said to help them find a husband within the next year. Colindat is sometimes performed in costume, with instrumental accompaniment and choreography. Groups of young men (traditionally unmarried) are the main bearers and practitioners of the element; experienced men, often former group leaders, are responsible for the group’s training. The ritual songs are learned at daily rehearsals from the time the group is formed until Christmas Eve. In some areas, children are allowed to attend these rehearsals in order to learn the repertoire. As well as conveying the season’s greetings, this cultural heritage plays an important role in preserving social identity and ensuring cohesion.

© National Museum of Romanian Peasant

© National Museum of Romanian Peasant